Category: <span>Telehealth</span>

mental health

Has COVID-19 Impacted Your Mental Health? Feel Better Today!

Mental Health During The Covid-19 Pandemic

Just as it is important to take your temperature regularly, as a COVID-19 precaution, it is equally important to do a mental health check. COVID-19 is weighing heavy when it comes to our mental health and overall well-being.

Those that have never experienced a mental health condition are finding themselves wondering what is wrong with themselves, and what they can do to get back to their “happy place.” It may be difficult to pinpoint a fracture in mental well-being for those that have never suffered from a mental health condition before.

Some symptoms that could indicate a mental health condition are:

  • Feeling sad for more than half of your waking hours
  • Excessive worry or fear
  • Frequent uncontrollable mood changes
  • Fatigue and low energy levels
  • Impaired concentration
  • Thoughts that the world or others are better off without you
  • Inability to cope with daily stressors
  • Drug or alcohol dependence
  • Changes in diet

Of course, the above list is not all-inclusive; However, if you find yourself suffering from one or more of the bulleted symptoms above, you should seek the assistance of a medical professional at your earliest convenience.

For those that have suffered from mental illness in the past, COVID-19 is increasing the chance of relapse. If you feel triggered to go back to old habits, it is important to consult with a mental health professional. It may be a bit easier for those that have suffered or currently suffer from mental illness to pinpoint that they need to seek help than for those that have not experienced it before.

Keeping up with your regular self-care regime is important. Taking care of yourself is the first step to maintaining your mental health. This will better prepare you to cope with the challenges that you are faced with. Do your hair. Buy the new face mask. Continue yoga. Do what makes you feel good.

If you are feeling a bit off, talk to a friend or loved one. It may be difficult to talk about your feelings, but it can help! If you still feel like you could use more help, speak to your primary care doctor for a referral to a mental health professional, or contact a mental health professional directly. They will give you professional advice, and guidance that is specifically tailored to your needs. In-person and virtual meetings are available at Riverview CMHC, depending on your comfort level during the ongoing pandemic.

Mental Health

How to get help with mental health during COVID-19?

Coping With Mental Health During Covid-19

In the past year, lives have been taken, jobs have been lost, and many businesses have shut their doors for the last time. Vacations and celebrations have been put on hold, and people are becoming depressed and overwhelmed. The Covid-19 pandemic has caused a mental health crisis, and those that have never experienced a mental health issue previously, may not know where to turn. If you find yourself wondering how to get help with mental health during Covid-19, keep reading.

Telehealth to address concerns about mental health during covid-19 is an option that has expanded greatly during the pandemic, and those that need support for their mental health have the ability to consult with a professional remotely. This is the safest way to have a session with the doctor, as no one has to leave the comfort of their own space or come in contact with others. For those that have seen a mental health professional on a regular basis before the pandemic to keep their mental health at an optimum level, telehealth may seem like a difficult transition. While there is less of an in-person connection with virtual meetings, it is still a starting point, or a way to continue monitoring mental health for relapse. 

If you think that you may be suffering from a mental health issue, ask yourself the following:

  • Am I having severe negative thoughts?
  • Am I relying on substances, such as drugs or alcohol, to cope with day to day stressors?
  • Have my eating habits changed?
  • Are people constantly asking if I am okay?
  • Do I constantly feel like I am just in a mode of survival?
  • Has my sleeping pattern changed?
  • Am I restless most of the time?
  • Am I more tired than before?

If you answered “yes” to one or more of these questions, you may be suffering from deteriorating mental health. You can get assistance with this by scheduling an in-person or telehealth appointment with your primary care physician, trying to talk it out with a trusted individual in your circle, or by contacting a mental health professional directly.

If you feel overwhelmed more often than not, it is in your best interest to be seen (in-person or virtually) by a mental health professional. Their main job is to help in determining the cause of your mental health deteriorating and to come up with a plan in order to combat the issue. 

Most importantly, if you have thoughts that your life isn’t worth living or you seem to be feeling hopeless, this is a mental health emergency. Go to your nearest emergency room, or contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255.